Tag: Mt Warning

568. Sunday 3rd September 2017. House painting and a long bush hike…

Friday 1st September (First day of Spring)

For the first time in a long, long, long time I did not post  last week.

Shame! Shame! Shame!

We started painting the house interior last week and it has continued all this week.

Today was a lay day.

Yahoo!

Saturday 2nd September

Met sister Enid and hubby Ken at Binna Burra a small parcel of private land within the Lamington National Park along the Scenic Rim Region in the McPherson Ranges. The car park is 800 metres above sea level. Today we took a hike along the Daves Creek Loop Trail which took us through some heavily wooded country, some open heathland and spectacular steep cliffs some 900 metres above sea level.

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One of the legacies of Cyclone Debbie earlier this year. Although the cyclone came nowhere near this region, it was hit by strong winds and heavy rains. We saw many fallen trees along the track.

In places we could look across deep valley floors within ancient volcanic caldera and see Mt Warning across the border in NSW. Todays 4 hour, 12 Klm up and down hike was a sort of warm up preparation for a more challenging hike/climb of Mt Warning…perhaps in October.

In places the track skirted steep cliff edges which made for a nervous bit of careful walking and to ensure there were no trips or slips on the downward slope.

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Our path follows that cliff line on the left. The track can be seenheading close to the edge. The high range in the distance is part of an ancient volcanic caldera and overlooks the Tweed Valley in NSW. Look carefully and you can see a Telstra Tower midway aling the ridge. further forward but unseen is whta is known as The Best of All Lookouts in Springbrook National park which I have written about before.

We stopped for lunch on a cliff edge overlooking the Numinbah Valley where we could see the ribbon of back road which travels over the range down into the Tweed Valley of NSW to Murwillumbah.

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Our precarious lunch spot.

I am nervous about heights so removing my camera, hat, walking pole and backpack was done very carefully. A playful bird flitted around us looking for a handout of small amounts of bread which it took and placed in the fork of several bushes nearby.

Somewhere along the track we crossed a small brook or creek, no more than a stride wide which had a small trickle of water struggling through the rocks. This was Daves Creek for which the track was named.

After lunch we started the climb on the return to the car park and were surprised by a sign which said Surprise Rock. It was indeed a surprise a large rock in the middle of otherwise rock free bush.

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Looking across the heathland from Surprise Rock.

The rock had beautiful views across heathland to Mt Warning in the distance.

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Looking past Surprise Rock towards Mt Warning and the Tweed Valley of NSW.

Eventually we made it back to the car park where we stopped to finish our sandwiches but a busy cheeky unidentified bird made three passes snapping at my sandwich, taking a little bite each time. On the third pass he took what remained of my sandwich in one low flying sneaky attack. We never even saw him coming.

On the way home I stopped to watch Para Gliders take off from an impossibly high and steep hill. Now that’s what I would like to do. On second thoughts I am a little nervous about heights.

At least I can watch.

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Preparing for a bit of time in the sky.
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Quick take off. A few steps and this pilot was flying.
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The carry bag doubles as a comfortable sitting harness.
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Mt Warning is in the background.
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A gentle landing.

503. Sunday 31st July 2016. Donnis is home, Melissa comes to visit,Miami Beach, Uki, Mt Warning Trial and Duranbah Beach…

Monday 25th July

I do not sleep well the night before I have to wake to an alarm clock.

My alarm was set for 4.30 am and as usual I wake several times during the night and on waking at 4am know there is no sense trying to get back to sleep for that remaining 30 minutes.

Sigh!

Today Donnis returned home from Canada. Her flight arrived in Brisbane at 6am.

I allowed an hour for the drive and was amazed at the amount of traffic on the M1 Motorway at 5am on a dark winters morning. Despite heavy bumper to bumper traffic on one 5 Klm section of road near Springwood I still arrived at Brisbane International Airport by 6am. I knew it would be some time before Donnis plane arrived, passengers disembarked and she was processed through Customs and Immigration and she emerged into the bright sunshine of Brisbane. I went to McDonalds to have breakfast and a coffee while I waited. Finally she emerged at 7.30 without any luggage but with a long story.

Her flight plans were to leave Calgary Airport to fly to Las Vegas USA and connect to a flight to Los Angeles then connect with a flight to Brisbane Aus. The Calgary people arranged for her luggage to be booked through to LA. On arrival in LA with a limited window of time before getting from the Domestic terminal to the International terminal, get seat allocation then through security to the flight gate ready for boarding.

Her luggage did not arrive in LA and after wasting precious time lodged a lost luggage claim with the airline and scooted for the International terminal. After passing through security on the way to the boarding gate, she stopped at the rest rooms and on to the gate. She realised she had left her carry-on luggage in the rest room. Hurrying back she found her hand luggage was gone. No time to lodge a lost property claim she hurried to her flight. After she told this tale to me I saw her face crease in frustration. On top of missing luggage and lost carry-on luggage she realised she had also left her memory foam pillow on the airplane seat.

Later in the day we were able to laugh about the misadventure. Los Vegas is often called Lost Wages but in this case we will call it Lost Luggage.

Tuesday 26th July

After a few phone calls and email exchanges the luggage was delivered to us.

We also located the carry on bag. It was at the LA Airport Police. For complications to have it sent to Oz via Fedex would cost $400 plus we would have to jump through a few US hoops of fire.

Grrr!

Saturday 30th July

My eldest daughter Melissa arrived late this afternoon for an overnight stay before she attends a course of laser treatment for horses in the morning. It was a wonderful visit – short but a good opportunity to catch up.

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Melissa and me.

In the afternoon Donnis realised her Canadian passport is missing. On reflecting she recalls an incident in the washroom in LA when she thought a woman took something while Donnis was washing her face. So on top of all the other lost stuff we now have to report a lost/stolen passport.

Grrr!

Sunday 31st July

This was a long busy day.

After Melissa left for her laser course we took off for the Farmers market at Miami Beach. As regular readers will know, I am not a fan of markets. Any kind of market. While Donnis was wandering around looking at the same stuff, I just kept walking around looking for inspiration. I did not find any.

Afterwards we drove down into NSW and through the town of Murwillumbah to Uki. (That is pronounced You Ki, not Yukky) From there we headed up into the hills of Mt Warning to find a motorcycle Observed Trials event. (For an explanation have a look here   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorcycle_trials   )

This was a relatively low key club day and most of the observed sections were similar to what I used to ride 30 years ago. 310716 trials3310716 trials2310716 trials1310716 trials310716 trials5310716 trials4The bikes are now even lighter in weight and more powerful performance but it was good to see the bike I was riding 30 years ago ( Yamaha TY 175)

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Yamaha TY 175

are still competitive. Most of the trials bikes these days are Gas Gas

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Gas Gas Trials Bike

After leaving the Mt Warning property we drove to Fingal Head – this was my third week in a row I have been here. The hope was that we would see whales again. No such luck today. We did however see a pod of dolphins cruising along in the waves just a little way off the cliffs.

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Another couple of close dolphins.
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This is cute. Could that be a young dolphin staying close to mum?
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A pair of dolphins.

It was exciting to see them swim with the waves towards the cliffs.

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Dolphins riding the waves.

After leaving Fingal we drove to Duranbah Beach the northernmost beach in NSW which is really in Queensland and is considered part of the Gold Coast Region.

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Duranbah Beach with the Point Dangar Lighthouse above the Cliffs. The Lighthouse straddles the NSW Queensland border. Behind and below the hill is another similar structure in the middle of the street which also delineates the two states. The structures line up with each other. The border line runs along Boundary street. East Bound is on the Qld side while west bound is in NSW. A few Klms away on the other side of the Gold Coast Airport, on the M1 Motorway is another border marker.

A group of board-riders, dressed in black wetsuits, beside the break-wall looked like a pod of dolphins or seals.

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Surf board riders at Duranbah in their wetsuits looking like dolphins or seals frolicking.

There was an onshore wind blowing making the waves sloppy and choppy.

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Riding at Duranbah – Known locally as D’Bar.

498. Sunday 26th June 2016. A funeral, a look around Port Macquarie and a visit to Murwillumbah…

Monday 20th June.

Despite the overcast, rain and blustering, cold westerly wind I drove from Port Macquarie to Newcastle Crematorium at Beresfield. I had allowed three hours for the journey and even stopping for fuel and a coffee break I was still 90 minutes early.

As people arrived it was clear the small chapel was not going to hold all the mourners. Apart from family, relatives and friends, Bobby had a wide circle of people who respected him. After the chapel was filled it was standing room only – outside in the cold. Bobby’s daughter Libby, ably assisted by her brother Grant, gave a moving eulogy. Bobby was a member of the National Rifle Association of Australia and at one stage was coach of the junior team which toured overseas. Mourners from the club and other business customers from Coonabarabran joined family and friend s to pay their respects.

Libby commented that sometimes her father was a Grumpy Old Man but we loved him. Judging by the tears, the 12 grandchildren also loved him.

Goodbye Bobby.

After refreshments at Beresfield Bowling Club I drove back to Port Macquarie arriving well after dark. Within minutes I laid down and fell asleep for a couple of hours. It was a long day, including 6 hours of driving and an emotional event.

Tuesday 21st June.

I decided to stay another day so I could be refreshed for the drive back to the Gold Coast. I drove around looking at some of the many beaches around Port Macquarie.

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Town Beach

Town Beach is adjacent to the breakwater and marina wall. This wall is different to most I have seen elsewhere, almost every stone face is painted with a memorial or endless love sonnet or even just a memento of a visit.

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These are the painted rocks along the breakwater walkway.
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This man is painting his own message on one of the breakwater rocks.

There is a great deal of beach erosion, a legacy of the violent storm experienced all along the Eastern Seaboard of Australia a few weeks ago.

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Beach erosion along Town Beach from recent storms

It was here I watched the cargo ship, “ISLAND TRADER” enter the narrow seawall opening into the Hastings River and marina and canal residential community. The ship carries supplies to and from Lord Howe Island almost 600 Klms offshore. LHI is part of NSW and therefore part of Australia. Port Macquarie is the closest NSW port to LHI.

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Island Trader returning from Lord Howe Island.

Shelley Beach has a memorial to Harry Thompson who arrived with his family in a caravan in 1960.

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Shelley Beach
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Harry Thompson is silent sentinel over his Shelley Beach. Note the cleared understory of the beachside vegetation.
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Picnic shelter carved to represent the interior of Harry Thompsons caravan where he and his wife and son lived for 40 years.

Perhaps the best explanation of the story is from this Flikr Page.

 “In 1960 Harry and Jean Thompson moved from Warren in western NSW after winning the lottery and buying a caravan. Being from the bush, with no experience of the beach Harry got bogged in the sand at Shelly Beach at Port Macquarie on the NSW mid North Coast.

The Thompsons decided there and then that they had found their spiritual home and thereafter made their caravan their permanent home at beautiful Shelly Beach,

The Thompsons were long time unofficial caretakers of this idyllic Port Macquarie beach and in the process became legendary as they successfully garnered the support of Port Macquarie residents in their effort to resist many vigorous attempts by the local Port Macquarie – Hasting Shire Council to evict them from their self proclaimed beach side home.

Harry Thompson, died on 31st January 2000 at age 83 and the community began fund raising for a memorial, now evident at the northern end of Shelly Beach in the form of a wooden sculpture of Harry and interestingly, his caravan. The area has become known as ‘Harry’s Corner’ and a walking trail with 254 steps, all laboriously built by Harry, leads to a nearby lookout now known as ‘Harry’s Lookout’

Such was the fondness with which Harry was held he was elected citizen of the year in 1983 and in 1999 was proclaimed ‘Mayor of Shelly Beach’

 

In 2009 an unbelievable mindless act of vandalism saw the sculpture of Harry decapitated. Fortunately local builder and friend of Harry, Ted Sala, came to the rescue and repairs were made and Harry once again stands a silent sentinel watching over his beloved Shelly Beach.”

 

I also visited secluded Miners Beach now an unofficial nudist beach, and given the weather today very few people were seen, all dressed of course.

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Miners Beach. Note the Banksia.
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Little Miners Beach.

Most of the beaches on the south side of Port Macquarie are at the base of steep cliffs much dressed in native vegetation including the wonderful Banksia’s.

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Much of the cliffside around the Port Macquarie beaches have all native vegetation. Currently Hastings Council are removing non native species. These beautiful banksia frame the scenery.

A walk has been established from Town Beach all the way through the beaches as far as the Tacking Point Lighthouse.

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Tacking Point Lighthouse.

Nobby’s Beach is on this walk but does have a one way access road as well.

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Nobby’s Beach

At Flynns Beach

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Flynns Beach notice to weed brought in by recent storms.

I watched boogie board riders in shallow water in front of the cliff face.

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It was cold on the beach today but these wetsuit clad boogie board riders were enjoying themselves.
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This rider needs to be careful he does not bite off his tongue.
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These riders were following the break of the waves…towards the rock!

At the end of my journey was Tacking Point Lighthouse. The  lighthouse was built high on a rocky headland in 1879 and is listed on the National Trust Heritage Register. The light house was built due to the large number of shipwrecks in the area. There were twenty shipwrecks between 1823 and 1878. The lighthouse was only 8 metres tall due to the height of the headland itself. It is similar in construction height to Sugarloaf Point Lighthouse which also sits on a high headland at Seal Rocks South of Forster.

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Lighthouse Beach looking south.

Late in the day I went to Lake Cathie (Locals pronounce it Lake Cat Eye which is probably a derivation of the original, Lake Cat Hie. It depends on which local you speak to and how long they have been a local). Calling it Lake Cathie alerts locals that you are an uninformed visitor.

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The calm reflective beauty of Lake Cathie where is runs into the ocean.
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Lake Cathies looking towards the bridge.

Wednesday 22nd June.

Another long day of driving home. Although there were lots of stop/slow roadworks I still managed the trip in 7.5 hours. Once home I fell asleep and woke in time for a light dinner and watch round 2 of the 3 round State of Origin series. Queensland won round one and only needed to win on their home ground to win the series for 2016. Despite strong defence by NSW and some good tries to both sides, Queensland won 26 to 16 and making them series winners ten years of the last eleven. The third round in NSW in three weeks was a sellout before tonight and the game will be just as tough despite it being a “dead rubber”.

Saturday 25th June

Astute and regular readers will recall I broke my wrist in an ummm, bicycle accident on 2nd August 2015. I required wrist surgery to install a T piece stainless steel plate. For 10 months I have been doing regular physiotherapy and taking strong nerve pain medication. I was on 300 Mg of Lyrica twice a day (the maximum advised does is 600Mg per day) and another pain medication, 10 Mg of Endep at bedtime. Although the medical profession say the medication is not addictive it is not something which you can just stop taking as there will be withdrawal symptons. One of the many side effects is weight gain. In my case about 10 Kg. I am pleased to report that I have stopped physiotherapy and now using the hand in regular daytime functional uses rather than the regime of particular exercises to regain use of the hand. What I am most pleased about is I started a slow withdrawal of the medication and I have not had any medication for two days. No constant pain and I am sleeping.

YeeHar!!!

However, although the last two nights sleep have been a little troubled and have woken a few times during the night.

Silly repetitive dreams.

Hmmm!!!

I mention these two drugs in case readers ever find themselves on Lyrica or Endep and need to know the slow process of coming off the drug.

Sunday 26th June

Yesterday evening and again this morning it was quite cold with overnight temps down around 10 degrees. Yeah Yeah I know. It only begins to get cold at minus 10. Remember we live on the Gold Coast and spent the last 30 years living in the tropics. Anything less than 23 degrees is cold!

Now for something totally different.

I drove to Murwillumbah about 70 Klms from home. The town is just over the border in NSW and is situated on the mid reaches of the Tweed River

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Tweed River looking east.
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Delightful timber cabin cruiser on the Tweed River.
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Another lovely old boat on the Tweed.

in what is surprisingly called the Tweed Valley. Once upon a time the original Pacific highway ran through here, following the Tweed River into Tweed Heads and on into Coolangatta Queensland. The town is not large in terms of size or population but it does have an impressive art gallery called, Tweed Regional Gallery and Margaret Olley Art Centre.

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Tweed Regional Gallery and Margaret Olley Art Centre.

Apart from the impressive paintings and sculptures it also includes a re-production of Margaret Olley’s home in Paddington, Sydney. The rooms have been re-created using photos and includes all the bric a brac, furniture, clothes, magazines, books, painting materials, weird statuatry  and assorted junk which was in the house at the time of her death. It also includes the stove top, oven and the kitchen sink. The windows also include the original tissue thin ragged curtains on the original house. The gallery sits on a hill overlooking the lush pastures of the Tweed

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Tweed River and valley.

while in the distance is the looming presence of Mt Warning (named by Captain Cook when he sailed along the coast in 1770) and other peaks which were formed by a massive volcano twenty million years ago. The other peaks are also

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Mt Warning
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Mt Warning and Tweed Valley.

the remains of the volcanic caldera. There is much to see in the Tweed Valley and surrounding peaks, National Parks and caldera farmlands.

 

I will save a return visit for when Donnis is home.